A green streak of light broke the night skies over Florida and Georgia on Saturday as a meteor sped through Earth’s atmosphere and possibly made it to terra firma.

The meteor was logged by about 250 people on the American Meteor Society’s website from areas as far south as Port St. Lucie through Atlanta.

Mike Hankey, operations manager for AMS, said the meteor is not part of a known shower, although the Lyrids peak in about two weeks and become active on April 14.

“Residents near Perry reported boom sounds after the meteor, which suggests it penetrated deep enough into the atmosphere to survive,” Hankey said. “I have talked to one person who is out today looking for it near Perry.”

The fireball was recorded on at least one dashcam video by EVE Pro Guides.

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But multiple Twitter users also posted about their sightings. The National Weather Service in Tallahassee said it was caught on the GOES East lightning mapper tool.

You might miss it in the loop if you blink, so here's a still of the flash!pic.twitter.com/V3zN1kfj8u

— NWS Tallahassee (@NWSTallahassee)March 31, 2019

The@NWSTallahassee confirmed a meteor fell to Earth on Saturday night after it was spotted in the sky by people in Florida.https://t.co/sQ61dUIvm1

— Twitter Moments (@TwitterMoments)March 31, 2019

The different colors of fireballs are caused by vaporized elements from the meteor itself. They can range from red to bright blue, and sometimes violet. A green color typically means the presence of nickel, according to the AMS.